DTRG weekend - click on the relevant link for the different mines .....

 

This walk: 2011-9-24. Botallack mine.

 

1. On a notice board inside The Count House at Botallack. In the 1960s, the Count House was a folk club (see here) - new DTRG member Berni was present when this 'live' recording of a concert was made, on 11th November 1965, my dad's birthday - and he was there, too, along with my mother and sister!

 

2. Approaching the Bunny Warren, so-called because bunny meant a great collection of ore without a vein leading to it or from it. More properly known as Gryll's Bunny mine working.

 

3. Small side adit into the roof.

 

4. The entrance to the walk-in part of a very old mine, above which evidence has been found of Bronze Age tin activity.

 

5. In the entrance.

 

6. Another small adit ....

 

7. Looking for Roman Period pick marks in the roof.

 

8.Another digging.

 

9. And ........ another.

 

10. As previous photo.

 

11. Berni in the entrance.

 

12. The Cornish Sphinx - part of a ruined wall.

 

13. A National Trust house where the area warden used to live.

 

14. Nearby bridge on an old track that crossed an area that was subsequently used as a dressing floor, no doubt where the bal maidens used to work.

 

15. General scene - the modern head gear is from when Geevor tried to re-open parts of Botallack.

 

16. In this area are Wheal Chick, Wheal Hen and Wheal Cock shafts.

 

17. Another of the trio of shafts.

 

18. Looking over the protecting wall.

 

19. Looking over the edge by the shaft of Wheal Cock.

 

20. It was explained!

 

21. Down there, once stood an engine shed.

 

22. Not far from the sea!

 

23. Chimneys at Botallack.

 

24. A walled shaft - Wheal Cock?

 

25. Zoomed view across towards Trewellard and Pendeen.

 

26. Looking towards Land's End (not in this photo, though).

 

27. Old copper dressing floor, where still nothing grows.

 

28. Another sea view.

 

29. General scene.

 

30. Walking back towards the main shaft at Botallack - Allen's Shaft.

 

31. The Crowns - the upper building housed a winding engine while the lower one housed a pump.

 

32. Forgotten what this is.

 

33. Again, Allen's Shaft.

 

34. The Crowns .........

 

35. As previous.

 

36. A side adit into the cliff.

 

37. Another angle.

 

38. We thought this might have been a chough, they were heard, but this appears to be a raven.

 

39. Getting closer .....

 

40. Zoomed view.

 

41. The weather this afternoon was ideal - unlike at Ding Dong this morning.

 

42. Getting closer to The Crowns.

 

43. A square hole in the cliff beside the path.

 

44. We're there!

 

45. The sea below.

 

46. Ditto.

 

47. New woodwork as part of the recent consolidation work? There appears to be a plaque ........ can anyone read it!

 

48. Inside the winding house.

 

49. The pit inside the winding engine house.

 

50. Seen from the path beside the engine house.

 

51. The flue from the boiler had to go up the cliff to develop enough draught to be efficient.

 

52. Down on the right is an early adit into the cliff ..... see next photo .....

 

53. Here, the entrance is blocked by deliberately placed boulders.

 

54. Down below is the pumping engine house - we didn't go there .....

 

55. ..... the path looked a bit "iffy"!

 

56. Leaving The Crowns, in their magnificent isolation.

 

57. Zoomed view.

 

58. A large buddle.

 

59. Another engine house.

 

60. Part of a small calciner and arsenic reclamation works?

 

61. Light on the sea.

 

62. The arch is part of the extensive labyrinth system for reclaiming arsenic from hot vapour from the tin roasting oven .....

 

63. More labyrinth .....

 

64. Labyrinth .....

 

65. Labyrinth .....

 

66. Labyrinth.

 

67. Old and older!

 

68. Another scene.

 

69. So many!

 

70. Steps to ???

 

71. A series of buddles.

 

72. Entrance to the calciner ovens .....

 

73. As previous photo.

 

 


Ordnance Survey © Crown copyright 2005. All rights reserved. Licence number 100047373.
Also, Copyright © 2005, Memory-Map Europe, with permission.

Map of Botallack, showing The Count House